Anglo-Saxon Women and the Church: Sharing a Common Fate


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Myths of British ancestry

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Women and law in the Anglo-Saxon period

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Middle English Legends of Women Saints: Introduction

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Sharing a Common Fate

Log In Sign Up. They were Celtic people who were early inhabitants of Britain. The Romans attacked them in the first century and they became a part of the Roman Empire. In , the Romans had turned back to their country, so Britain was left unprotected. According to a tradition, in the first people came from the great North German plain. And they settled Kent. They were Jutes, perhaps from peninsula of Jutland in Denmark. After Jutes, Anglo-Saxons came to the Britain. So, Germanic tribes are ancestor of English.

During Anglo-Saxon period, England was divided into separate kingdoms. The most important areas were Kent, Northumbria, Mercia and Wessex. During last two centuries It is about Anglo-Saxons tried to protect themselves from Vikings or Norsemen. They admired men of outstanding courage, whatever tribe they came from. Loyalty to their chosen leaders was very important for them. Persons of rank were received with grave courtesy whatever their tribe or people Heroic human will and courage allowed individuals to control their own response.

Anglo-Saxon society was well-developed, branching. Unit from Family, to Clan, to Tribe and then to the Kingdom. They had democratic habit of mind. They had a passion for fine ornament and the produced many beautiful pieces, such as Brooches and Bracelets of exquisite design.

Myths of British ancestry | Prospect Magazine

They were in fact a more artistic and poetic people than their Norman conquerors. In that time, it was important to send teachers to England. The spread of Christianity was strengthened by missionaries from the continent. In , a bishop of London attended the church council at Arles in France. The most of these, Saint Augustine came in and established a monastery at Canterbury.

He became the first Archbishop of Canterbury. In , there was a synod at Whitby Abbey. It was a famous monastery for men and women under the leadership of the Abbes Hilda. She was also spiritual director of the pious Caedmon, the first English religious poet. This synod united the English church with Roman Christianity.

The church began to draw the island kingdoms together and encouraged ties with the rest of Europe. Poems were not written down until a much later period. The professional poet or scop had a very important function in this society. He was the memory and historian of the tribe. The two most important traditions of Anglo-Saxon poetry were the heroic tradition and elegiac tradition, which mourns the passing of earlier, better times. Of the Anglo-Saxon churchmen wrote in Latin. The greatest of these was known as the Venerable Bede who is author of a history of the English church and people.

He was an excellent historical authority of its time. Alfred promoted use of written English and was responsible for the initiation of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, the first historical record to be kept in English.

Thus, the neighbours of Britain, on the continent, attacked them. Following Jutes, Anglo-Saxons came. But England already was born in warfare.

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Anglo-Saxon Civilization: 1- Although the Anglo-Saxons frequently fought among themselves, they had a great deal in common. They produced many beautiful pieces, such as brooches and bracelets.


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Most of the designs were mythological. Originally the designs consisted of sea creatures but later, the sea creatures were replaced with quadrupeds. It caused them to start painting and sculpting. Most of Anglo-Saxon paintings were gospel and other books. Anglo-Saxon sculpture consisted of mostly stone crosses and had much Mediterranean influence.

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During this time, there was a shortage of gold, so metalworkers used silver and bronze. The names of these days are derived from the names of Old Anglo- Saxon Gods. The Establishment of Christianity: 1- Christianity came early to Britain. In , a bishop of London attended the Church council at Arles in France.

He built a church at Canterbury. Anglo-Saxon poetry was an oral art. Poets recited well- known poems.

Anglo-Saxon Education: 1- Most of the schools were linked to the monasteries. They were an exclusive responsibility of the church. The students were referred to as the scholar. There was where men and women were taught in the same place. Most of the time men and women were taught separately because men grow up to do different things than woman, and women grow up to do different things than men.

Writing was not always part of the Anglo-Saxon curriculum.


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They also read Latin. Education was very linked to the church. Government of Anglo-Saxons: 1- The Anglo-Saxons civilization had a main government, but most of the towns had a mayor-type person, called a sheriff. Each town has its own rules and local government. These districts were called shires. Each shire was run by a sheriff, who was chosen by the king. Beowulf Product : Beowulf is the longest and very greatest surviving Anglo-Saxon poem. No clear information about of this famous creation. And it was created around the 7th or 8th century.

Anglo-Saxon Women and the Church: Sharing a Common Fate Anglo-Saxon Women and the Church: Sharing a Common Fate
Anglo-Saxon Women and the Church: Sharing a Common Fate Anglo-Saxon Women and the Church: Sharing a Common Fate
Anglo-Saxon Women and the Church: Sharing a Common Fate Anglo-Saxon Women and the Church: Sharing a Common Fate
Anglo-Saxon Women and the Church: Sharing a Common Fate Anglo-Saxon Women and the Church: Sharing a Common Fate
Anglo-Saxon Women and the Church: Sharing a Common Fate Anglo-Saxon Women and the Church: Sharing a Common Fate
Anglo-Saxon Women and the Church: Sharing a Common Fate Anglo-Saxon Women and the Church: Sharing a Common Fate
Anglo-Saxon Women and the Church: Sharing a Common Fate Anglo-Saxon Women and the Church: Sharing a Common Fate

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